Comments

  1. Nidhi Gulati says:

    Great article! in my opinion, Social well being may be harder to measure in numbers, so observing and talking in the streets and plazas and building on to Holly Whyte’s works may lead to interesting insights. I conducted an ethnography on a retrofitted Dog-park using Ray Oldenburg’s concept of a ‘Third Place’ and the results were truly estonishing. Cities can be and should be designed for Social well being, it adds tremendously to the sense of place and rootedness. We will all be looking forward to the index; the more evidence we have, the more support we get for People-Friendly cities.

  2. PlaceMakers says:

    Check out the 1-hour conversation on the emerging science of happiness with Scott Bernstein and Hazel Borys.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] happiness. Hazel Borys, principal at Placemakers, writes on how we measure happiness, exploring if national happiness, well-being, and social capital are related to the way we plan our [...]

  2. [...] In most physical and policy planning, triple bottom line benchmarks focus on environment and economy, and tend to skim over the subject of society. That’s probably because urban design impacts are much easier to measure with respect to profit and planet than they are with respect to people.  [...]

  3. [...] couple of weeks ago I floated some ideas on a national Urban Happiness Index. Similar to Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness index, which is being contemplated by China and [...]

  4. [...] Can cities help you forget your troubles? C’mon, get happy! [...]

  5. [...] or depleted by the way our neighbourhoods, towns, cities, and rural landscapes are developed – here, here, and here. We’ve been discussing these ideas in national terms, looking at indices and [...]

  6. [...] or depleted by the way our neighbourhoods, towns, cities, and rural landscapes are developed – here, here, and here. We’ve been discussing these ideas in national terms, looking at indices and [...]

  7. [...] Borys, Hazel. «Can cities help you forget your troubles? C’mon, get happy!», placemakers.com, 29 octobre [...]

  8. [...] happiness. Hazel Borys, principal at Placemakers, writes on how we measure happiness, exploring if national happiness, well-being, and social capital are related to the way we plan our [...]

  9. [...] or depleted by the way our neighbourhoods, towns, cities, and rural landscapes are developed – here, here, and here. We’ve been discussing these ideas in national terms, looking at indices and [...]

  10. [...] I do not have space to suggest what these metrics might be, only to suggest that they are needed.  Think of it as the urban planning equivalent of [...]

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