Happy New Year: Celebrating Venetian biophilia

This reflective time of year is ideal for thinking back on the people, places, and experiences that brought solace in 2014, and offering thanks. I was particularly struck by the power of community in challenging moments, and how support from friends, family, and colleagues makes a real difference. And by the power of place for solitary and convivial comforts alike.

One of my strongest personal sources of solace is biophilia – or the love of living systems – within urbanism, particularly enjoyable this November in Venice. Because of the levels of urbanity within this floating city, every thriving plant offers up extra enjoyment.

An unrelated realization walking these streets at high tide underscored the need to lean more heavily on holistic solutions to our global commons problem, so what we value most stays within our reach.

Wishing you all a happy new year, with a few images of inspiration and encouragement from Venice.

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All images CreativeCommons ShareAlike License with attribution to Hazel Borys. Click for larger formats.

Hazel Borys

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  1. [...] Ample studies have been done on the power of biophilia and green in the city. Portland offers it up in spades with the number and frequency of parks and squares downtown, providing ample shade, grassy spaces, and an opportunity to linger and decompress in the busy city. Researchers in Toronto found that having 10 more trees on your block has health benefits similar to being seven years younger or making $10,000 more per year. My fellow PlaceMakers Kaid Benfield and Hazel Borys talk more here and here. [...]

  2. [...] you’re a frequent PlaceShakers reader, you’ve heard us tout biophilia – or the love of living systems – particularly where nature has been integrated into urbanism. [...]

  3. [...] you’re a frequent PlaceShakers reader, you’ve heard us tout biophilia – or the love of living systems – particularly where nature has been integrated into urbanism. [...]

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