Comments

  1. Always a pleasure to read your posts and learn from them. Today provided an additional technical bonus lesson – learning how to block an annoying .gif in Firefox. Thanks! ;-)

  2. This article started out so promising, but I was sorely disappointed. Scott, quoting rap artists really should not be done by someone who does not know the music. The quote you were looking for from Biggie was “the more money you make, the more problems you get…” The quote “mo’ money, mo’ problems” is from a song. Biggie did not say “mo’ money mo’ problems” once in the song (I know because I can rap his verse verbatim). The song was a track on his “Life After Death” album. Puff Daddy/Sean Combs said it only in the music video and Kelly Price sang it on the chorus/refrain. Biggie was murdered by the time the single came out. The song was a smash hit. It was and still is a big song in Hip-Hop history. The epitome of NY Hip-Hop. It was the first hip-hop song myself and many people my age remember singing along to. To attribute the quote to Biggie (as “what Biggie says” …once again he’s dead so “said” would have been more appropriate) is incorrect. However, your original attribution to Jay-Z revealed that Scott, you have no idea what you are talking about and really did not care enough to find out. That is stupid on your part. You were able to correctly reference to Spinal Tap and Portlandia. Next time you do not think a culture is worth your time researching stick to writing about the things you know like offbeat hipster comedic sitcoms and whatever that hot mess of feathered hair, terrible music and mockumentary overkill called Spinal Tap was. Furthermore, “Let me tell you a little something ’bout community.” If this is your attempt at “Ebonics” STOP. Using poor grammar when sloppily misquoting a rap hit is obnoxious at best and condescending at worst. Just a simple Google search could have saved you from this embarrassing article.
    I like to think there is a good reason why the Place Makers are a bunch of white people without any noticeable racial or ethnic diversity. I also like to think there is a good reason why diversity/race & ethnicity is not one of your “topics/top picks”. This article is starting to make me question whether there is a good reason after all or maybe for your group the only culture worth preserving in a community is a culture to which you can relate and understand.

    • PlaceMakers says:

      Guilty as charged, Daphney. And thanks for chiming in. Sincerely.

      I’ll be the first to admit that I know what I know and don’t know what I don’t know. You’re entirely correct that, perhaps over relying on the casual nature of the medium, I referenced a fairly well known (at least superficially, as you point out) pop-culture touchstone to make for a more broadly accessible intro. It was intended only as a bridge to a wider discussion but if instead it communicated cluelessness (or worse, dismissiveness), I can only offer apologies. Which I do.

      At the root of pop culture is, of course, culture, and I shouldn’t have played so fast and loose with things held in different ways by different people. Especially those things that, really, I know little or nothing about beyond the apparent.

      If nothing else, perhaps this exchange highlights even more one of the points I was hoping to get at: Community is a messy endeavor. There is so much more to finding common ground than just putting something out on the table. This really drives that point home, making for a regrettable stumble on my part which I hope to transition to a lesson learned.

      
Thanks for calling me out.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] that it stems from such high demand for these kinds of neighborhoods. As my colleague Scott Doyon has articulated, it’s a problem of success rather than one of failure. A lot of urban neighborhoods were [...]

  2. [...] that it stems from such high demand for these kinds of neighborhoods. As my colleague Scott Doyon has articulated, it’s a problem of success rather than one of failure. A lot of urban neighborhoods were [...]

  3. [...] that it stems from such high demand for these kinds of neighborhoods. As my colleague Scott Doyon has articulated, it’s a problem of success rather than one of failure. A lot of urban neighborhoods were [...]

  4. [...] that it stems from such high demand for these kinds of neighborhoods. As my colleague Scott Doyon has articulated, it’s a problem of success rather than one of failure. A lot of urban neighborhoods were [...]

  5. [...] that it stems from such high demand for these kinds of neighborhoods. As my colleague Scott Doyon has articulated, it’s a problem of success rather than one of failure. A lot of urban neighborhoods were [...]

Leave a Reply to How to Make Smart Growth More Lovable and Sustainable | Information From World Cancel reply

*

Confirm that you are not a bot - select a man with raised hand: